DeRose Method

Be Yourself

Be yourself.jpg

The Ethical Code of the Month for February is Satya – truthfulness.
Satya is about truth but not necessarily always being brutally honest with people in a way that offends. 
It relates to honesty with yourself and integrity in what you do.

Start by being honest with yourself – what are your strengths and weaknesses, what can you do less of, or more of? honestly.

Meditation Spotlight

According to the Oxford Dictionary of English: Meditation means "focus(ing) one's mind for a period of time, in silence or with the aid of chanting, for religious or spiritual purposes or as a method of relaxation." This is a very interesting definition, but clearly for someone who has studied the matter its flaws become clear. The state of meditation, or dhyána, is a state which can be described as linear intuition. Its technique certainly allows for the mind to be focused and may use symbols (interestingly referenced in the definition as silence, for no one observing someone metalizing a symbol will be able to hear anything!) or sounds (which the definition above refers to chanting).

The purpose of meditating, however, has never been a subject of debate. Whilst the roots that influence different types of practices may be naturalistic or religious, the goal of meditation is to achieve a higher state of consciousness, that of linear intuition.

In order to achieve this state, DeRose Method students train their technical execution on Saturday at 10:00. Visit our Timetable for more information!

Spiced Wholewheat Couscous with Sweet Potato and Pistachios

The nutty, nutritious, wholewheat couscous complements the fragrant sweet potato beautifully in this North African-inspired dish from Stella McCartney.

Ingredients

For the couscous

  • 3 small sweet potatoes

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil

  • 2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds

  • 150 g giant wholewheat couscous

  • 500 ml light vegetable stock or water

  • handful of raisins, preferably organic

  • 1 rounded teaspoon za’tar

  • 50 g unshelled, unsalted pistachios, chopped

To serve

  • 1 lemon
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons freshly chopped coriander
  • 2 tablespoons freshly chopped flatleaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon freshly chopped mint
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6.

Scrub the sweet potatoes under cold water and cut each into 6 wedges. Tip into a roasting tin, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and roast in the oven for about 20–25 minutes or until the sweet potato is tender and starting to caramelise at the edges. Add the pumpkin seeds to the pan for the last 5 minutes of cooking time.

While the sweet potato is cooking prepare the couscous. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large sauté pan, add the couscous and cook gently for 2–3 minutes until starting to brown. Add half of the stock or water to the pan and continue to cook for about 15 minutes, stirring frequently until the couscous is tender and has absorbed the liquid. Add the remaining stock or water to the pan as and when needed. Add the raisins, za’tar and chopped pistachios to the pan, season with salt and freshly ground black pepper and cool slightly.

Mix together the juice from half the lemon and the extra virgin olive oil and pour over the warm sweet potato when it comes out of the oven. Gently stir the freshly chopped herbs and roasted sweet potato wedges into the couscous and serve with extra lemon wedges for squeezing over.

7 (good) reasons why you should practise with us

1. Guaranteed results

We're so sure that you're going to love our school that we guarantee results. Here's our promise: "If you're not 100% satisfied with your experience - you get your first month's membership fees returned with no questions asked"

2. A complete lifestyle regime

The DeRose Method is a complete approach to life. Our classes and activities cover everything you need to improve your quality of life. From strength & flexibility training, meditation, stress-management, nutrition and social events... we've got it all covered.

Everything we teach is based on a lifetime's work by Professor DeRose - a highly respected author, teacher and philosopher who founded the first DeRose School in 1964.

3. Champions practise the DeRose Method

Kelly Slater, eleven-time World Surfing Champion • Guga Kuerten, former World No. 1 tennis champion • Graciele Herrmann, Olympic Swimmer • Antonio Antonioli, Ju Jitsu champion of Brazil, Pan America and Europe • Katja Kortstorm, of Cirque du Soleil

They all rely on the DeRose Method to reach the highest levels of performance in their fields.

4. Small classes

We don't believe in cramming as many people as possible into every class. Instead we think people learn best when they get lots of individual attention.

That's why our average class has 1 instructor and 6 students.

5. Highly qualified instructors

The instructors at DeRose Method London all have at least a decade of experience each. They're renowned for their knowledge, expertise and friendliness.

All DeRose Method instructors undergo extensive training and revalidate their certifications annually.

6. A Worldwide Network

The DeRose network is represented by over 250 establishments worldwide. Join DeRose Method London and you can use any of our other schools at no extra cost.

With locations in London, New York, Paris, Barcelona, Rome, Lisbon, Rio, Sao Paulo and Buenos Aires you get access to the same excellent service, friendly atmosphere and expert instructors wherever in the world you find yourself.

7. Long term and efficient results

95% of people that begin classes with us become lifelong practitioners. So we must be doing something right.

The best hot chocolate ... with melt-in-your-mouth marshmallows

There is no other better classical way to fix a freezing cold Monday... oh yeahhhhh....

By Jamie Oliver

Ingredients

  • 565 ml full cream or semi-skimmed milk

  • 2 tablespoons good-quality drinking chocolate

  • 1 handful marshmallows (non-meat gelling agents)

  • sugar, optional, to taste

Method

This takes around 3 or 4 minutes to make. First put the milk into a pan. Bring to a simmer – not a boil – and while it's heating, put a tablespoon of choccie powder and sugar, if using, into each mug. Add a little warmish milk from the pan to each mug – you just need enough to dissolve the chocolate powder. At this point, plonk a few marshmallows into each mug. When the milk is at a simmer, carefully pour it into a plastic jug or flask. I normally do this over a sink as I always end up spilling a bit (the trick is to have a big enough jug or flask so the milk only half fills it – you need the extra space for shaking and frothing).

Screw the lid on tightly, place a cloth over the lid for safety, and shake hard for a minute. Remove the lid, minding the steam, and pour the milk into your mugs. A little stir, and you can slurp your way to heaven!

Is it more important to have a strong body or to be flexible?

What it is more important? To be flexible or strong and muscular, like RoboCop?

Imagine a person who has difficulty moving, imprisoned by poor mobility tying up their shoes… How agonising! To even get out of bed or pick up a toothbrush that fell to the bathroom floor would be an immense effort…

It turns out that at this very moment, as you read this article, we age slowly.

Our body will "solidify" the joints, muscles and tendons, giving us less and less flexibility, until we reach the point when we need assisted help to tie our shoes, get out of bed and pick something up that just fell on the floor.

Lack of flexibility is not a natural thing, and sedimentation, which is slow and gradual, is due to lack of care and maintenance to the body, and this is how we live.

Everyone knows that when you buy a car, you need to do periodical maintenance. It is written in the user manual, the seller will tell you and the lights in the car will warn you to go and do it. Done, the car is like new!

Now just imagine you buy the car and never change the oil, instead of gasoline you put alcohol, salt, saturated fats, limitless amounts of sugars, you never change the tires or add air filters, oil, brake fluid, bearings ...

Instead of lasting 200,000 miles or more, the car would last 20,000 and would be completely ruined by the end.

Now, imagine ourselves, eating a considerable amount of unnecessary things, seldom observing our frugality, we may properly exercise at the gym, pushing ourselves to the maximum, working without rest, always breathing as someone who is ill (using only the upper part of the lungs) ... On Sundays excessively drinking more and more beer and wine and still holding onto an illusion of advancing towards old age in good health together with our children and grandchildren. Isn’t a little bit of illusion not the same?

Stretching is one of the most powerful and enjoyable ways to keep us flexible and healthy. In just one session we can produce energy in our body, create mild detoxification, increase flexibility in major joints and create a state of weightlessness and strength. Yes, you read that correct, strength within the body and almost no other technique can do it.

Army of Robocops

And it is with some sadness that I see men and women with strong and well-sculpted bodies, in pairs, coming out of gyms and fitness centres, as if on a production line.

Why is it we hold a false idea that swollen muscles defined by weightlifting is healthy?

For me and many other professionals in our area, a strong and flexible body is healthy and does not need to be enlarged for this purpose. It can be well defined and yet flexible. Who says a simple increase in muscle size means he is healthy?

Professionals

There is a need for he who does, to know what he does, having been trained for this and not just someone who titles himself " a stretching instructor."

Unfortunately, errors in the exercises instead of promoting health produce problems in the joints, muscles, spine and later on to the brain by seriously affecting the sense of balance. If this is not stopped and corrected it could put the person in serious bad health and discomfort.

Benefits

Validate benefits and you weaken something that has more to offer than just immediate results.

We do not like to validate benefits, but as this word is almost a disease in modern times, let it ...

If you do things the right way you will:

  • Increase energy in the body.
  • It will not eliminate stress, but will destroy it completely, because it will prevent it from returning.
  • By avoiding stress, you will eliminate a series of pains and diseases such as some ulcers.
  • Increase your body awareness.
  • Create a permanent state of health in the body.
  • You will feel lighter during your day to day.
  • Increased body awareness will help you avoid some bruising, tensions and among others torticollis.
  • Muscles prevent the consumption of energy that could be used at the end of the day on family activities, for yourself, your hobbies etc ...
  • Relieve most back pain, shoulder, neck, arm and other tendinitis

Gustavo Cardoso

Stand up without using the help of your hands

If you already practised with us, probably you heard this thousands of times "Stand up without using the help of your hands". Professor DeRose has pass this to us, instructors, and we perpetuate this knowledgment to our trainees and future instructors.

Our philosophy has a 5,000 years wisdom, and we can't beat Nature empiric acknowledgment.  But, recently, a scientific study came up to prove what we are saying for decades. 

Source: ScienceDaily.com

A simple screening test of musculo-skeletal fitness has proved remarkably predictive of all-cause mortality in a study of more than 2000 middle-aged and older men and women. The study, performed in Brazil by Dr Claudio Gil Araújo and colleagues at the Clinimex -- Exercise Medicine Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, is reported today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention.

The test was a simple assessment of the subjects' ability to sit and then rise unaided from the floor. The assessment was performed in 2002 adults of both sexes and with ages ranging from 51 to 80 years. The subjects were followed-up from the date of the baseline test until the date of death or 31 October 2011, a median follow-up of 6.3 years.

Before starting the test, they were told: "Without worrying about the speed of movement, try to sit and then to rise from the floor, using the minimum support that you believe is needed."

Each of the two basic movements were assessed and scored out of 5, with one point being subtracted from 5 for each support used (hand or knee, for example). Subjects were thus assessed by a composite score of 0 to 10, which, for the sake of the analysis, was ranked as four categories (C1, 0 C2, 3.5.5; C3, 6.5; and C4, 8).

A film of the sitting-rising test can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCQ2WA2T2oA

Over the study period 159 subjects died, a mortality rate of 7.9%. The majority of these deaths occurred in people with low test scores -- indeed, only two of the deaths were in subjects who gained a composite score of 10. Analysis found that survival in each of the four categories differed with high statistical significance. These differences persisted when results were controlled for age, gender and body mass index, suggesting that the sitting-rising test score is a significant predictor of all-cause mortality; indeed, subjects in the lower score range (C1) had a 5-6 times higher risk of death than those in the reference group (C4).

Commenting on the results, the investigators said that a high score in the sitting-rising test might "reflect the capacity to successfully perform a wide range of activities of daily living, such as bending over to pick up a newspaper or a pair of glasses from under a table."

However, in this study a composite score below 8 (that is, requiring more than one hand or knee support to sit and rise from the floor in a stable way) were associated with 2 fold higher death rates over the 6.3 year study period. By contrast, scores in the range of 8 indicated a particularly low risk of death during the tracking period. "Even more relevant," reported the investigators, "is the fact that a 1-point increment in the [sitting-rising] score was related to a 21% reduction in mortality." They added that this is the first study to demonstrate the prognostic value of the sitting-rising test.

Offering an explanation for the close correlation between the test scores and survival, Dr Araújo said: "It is well known that aerobic fitness is strongly related to survival, but our study also shows that maintaining high levels of body flexibility, muscle strength, power-to-body weight ratio and co-ordination are not only good for performing daily activities but have a favourable influence on life expectancy.

"When compared to other approaches to functional testing," added Dr Araújo, "the sitting-rising test does not require specific equipment and is safe, easy to apply in a short time period (less than 2 minutes), and reliably scored. In our clinical practice, the test has been shown over the past ten years to be useful and practical for application to a large spectrum of populations, ranging from paediatric to geriatric."

Dr Araújo emphasised the great potential of the sitting-rising test among primary care physicians looking for a quick appraisal of musculo-skeletal fitness in clinical or industrial settings. "If a middle-aged or older man or woman can sit and rise from the floor using just one hand -- or even better without the help of a hand -- they are not only in the higher quartile of musculo-skeletal fitness but their survival prognosis is probably better than that of those unable to do so."

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by European Society of CardiologyNote: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Brito LBB, Ricardo DR, Araujo DSMS, et al. Ability to sit and rise from the floor as a predictor of all-cause mortalityEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention, 2012; DOI: 10.1177/2047487312471759

The Secret of our Chai

Chai is a hallmark of the DeRose Method schools around the world. If you've tried our beloved chai, now you'll have the original recipe so you can make it for yourself or guests.

Ingredients (makes 1L)
half a liter of water
½ cup grated fresh ginger
five seeds of cardamom
two cinnamon sticks
three tablespoons of black tea leaves
five large tablespoons sugar
half a liter of milk

Method:
Start by adding ginger, cardamom and cinnamon to the water and boiling for about 3 minutes.
Add the milk, sugar and heat concoction just before the boiling point.
Turn off the heat, add the black tea and let it steep for about 3 minutes, no longer.

Strain, serve and enjoy :)