Mudrá

Author: DeRose, Treaties of Yoga


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Mudrá


A gesture of affection,

a gesture of pacification,
a gesture of tolerance.


A gesture that is felt,
a gesture that is profound,
a gesture of blessing.

Hands that strole,
hands that accomplish,
hands that hold the hands of companions,
as if to say to each one:
“you can count on my friendship,
I am your friend.”

Whichever it may be,
the gesture of Yôga,
transmits the force and love
that blooms from the depth of your soul
and ruptures from ones own hands …

This is mudrá!

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Mudrá is a language of gestures. It literally means gesture, seal or password. In Yôga, mudrá refers to those gestures made with the hands. They are defined as reflexological gestures because they set off a succession of states of consciousness and even a succession of physiological states associated with the former.


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The mudrás work or achieve their effects through neurological association and through reflexological conditioning. We cannot deny, in addition, a cultural component, which reinforces or diminishes the effect of the mudrás.


A curious fact regarding mudrás is that some of the same gestures can be observed in different ages, different hemispheres and different ethnic groups as well as cultures, something that can only be attributed to the collective unconscious and what some might call “coincidence.” There have been many different studies published in the areas of anthropology and psychology demonstrating that, no matter what the people, from a primitive tribe in Africa to a Nordic nation, certain gestures have a common meaning.