breathing thecniques

Asana - The Elements and Body Movement

The Asana Elements

Body Movement Training

In each class physical positions are executed in a choreographic format, with distinct passages between techniques. This concept was restored from the vestiges of Ancient Yôga during the codification of the DeRose Method. It not only adds a beauty and grace to every class but deepens your strength, flexibility, balance, agility and coordination.

Coping with stress (Part 2)

In this article we are going to continue the tips to manage stress and to experience the techniques of the DeROSE Method. These tips require around 5 min each, a total of 10 minutes
out of your day which could really change your response to stress.

Everyday, every time, take care of your body! The time in the same position plus the stress will tighten up your muscles. So practical tip: stretch your body. All you need is 5 minutes. Pay close attention to your spine and use its full range of movements.

:: 1st minute
Take a moment and straighten your spine. Spend 30 seconds balancing
yourself in one foot and then the other. If you can do it with your
eyes closed.

:: 2nd minute
Lean your body to your left. Be careful not to twist your hips. All
you need is 30 seconds to each side.

:: 3rd minute
Sitting down with your legs crossed, bring your left hand behind your
back supporting your back and being your right hand to your left knee,
twisting your spine. Stay in a comfortable position for the fist few
moments and then exhale to give your maximum. Once again. 30 seconds
is all you need for each side.

:: 4th minute
Stretch your legs in front of you and rest your body forward. Try to
touch your forehead on your knees whilst keeping them straight and
locked in. Aim for comfort. After 30 seconds return and lie down
facing the ground. Bend your knees and hold onto your ankles. Then
give your best effort to push with your thighs raising your knees and
torso off the ground. If you are able, try to look at the ceiling of
the room. All you need is 15 seconds.

:: 5th and final minute.
If you are able to execute an inverted position do so now if not,
just lie with your back on the floor and raise your feet above your
head. If you are able stay the minute in this position.

If you do this short routine you will notice that your body will perform much better for
the rest of the day.

All it takes is 5 minutes. After this time, observe yourself and try to notice your state of mind, your state of being.

Text adapted by Fabs,DeRose Method Tribeca article

Manage your stress using breathing techniques

The objective of this short technique is to bring more awareness and consciousness to the way you breathe and through this process take a few steps towards improved self esteem and confidence.

Note this is not a therapy, if you suffer from any condition seek professional medical help. This tip, much like the DeRose Method, is not a form of therapy — we would not be qualified for that!it is indeed a way to boost your performance.

So before you start check a couple of things:

1) blow your nostrils and make sure they are not obstructed. For the entirety of this technique we will ask you to breathe exclusively through your nostrils.

2) you body’s position does matter. Try to find a place where you will not be interrupted, where you can sit down and where you can keep your back straight — don’t lean back on the seat. Also pay attention to the position of your neck and keep it along the same line as your
spine, in other words, it is as if you want to be looking slightly up.

Now that you are setup spend the first few moments at simply noticing how you breathe. Try to inhale and exhale slower, using a greater capacity of your lungs. The next time you breathe try to pay attention to each stage in your breathing: inhalation, retention of the air whilst your
lungs are full, exhalation and retention of your lungs empty.

Maintain this breathing and when you next inhale project your abdomen outwards, giving you more room to expand your lungs. When you exhale contract your abdominal muscles to compress your lungs. Your next breathe will have even more air than before. Continue to breathe exclusively through your nostrils. Deeply and slowly.

If you are ready, increase the difficulty. If you so not feel comfortable continue executing this variation until the end of the time. To increase the difficulty add a rhythm. For example, use a
measure of 4 seconds for each stage of your breathing:

* 4 seconds to inhale;
* 4 seconds to keep your lungs full;
* 4 seconds to exhale;
* 4 seconds to keep your lungs empty.

All it takes is 5 minutes. After this time, observe yourself and try to notice your state of mind, your state of being.

Text adapted by Fabs, DeRose Method Tribeca article

The importance of breathing in everything we do

breathing

Our breathing is greatly interference of emotional states. Anxiety for example, produces a shorter, accelerated breathing, as a state of serenity produces a deep, slow breath. There is no denying the relationship between breathing patterns and emotional states or consciousness. The ancient Dravidians people who created the techniques used in the method, realized that dominate the breath be able to interfere with states of consciousness and better control your emotions. Leaving the more practical things, for example when you exhale slower you recover faster, do a physical fatigue or emotional stress. Not that you will no longer feel tired or even have that emotional feeling, but the fact is that there is a tear to both physical and emotional exhaustion. When we feel heavy emotions such as hate, fear, stress etc internally released a lot of toxins that are released in excess become detrimental to our health. Also, physically, the quicker we recover from a fatigue better. So the simple fact that we can better control the output of the air, becoming aware of muscle movement involved in breathing and causing the air to exit more slowly, we can reduce the wear on both physical and emotional context.

Rhythms and evolution in practice

The Dravidian cataloged different proportions of respiratory rhythms to generate different states of consciousness. The pace is always described as a ratio to the order and always Inspiration - Latching Air - Expiration - Hold breath. When you type the number you can put any value as long as the proportion is respected. Example, 1-1-1-0 rhythm. You must inspire, retain the breath and exhale at the same time and will not hold breath. So be inspired in 4 seconds will maintain the same proportion also in the other phases that have the number 1. The main rhythms are:

1-1-1-1 - Our breath is arrhythmic in nature and it also interferes with the fickle flow of our thoughts. Disciplinary breathing to maintain a cadence is disciplining the mind to keep focus. The pace is something that our mind does not like. She prefers the distraction. See for example, when you start drumming a song. In his introduction is easier to keep the pace. When the voice intoning the melody goes, if you're not too focused on what will fumble and lose the cadence. In conclusion, while maintaining the same for all phases contributes to mental focus and a state of stability.

1-2-1-2 - This rhythm is important to give the body more time to assimilate oxygen and energy being captured in breathing. Doubling time of retentions produces, in air retention this assimilation and retention without air, a time for greater insight, because that is what the parade without air in the lungs produces.

1-2-3-0 - This ratio increases the output of air from the lungs and this has been explained as aiding recovery from wear. Be it physical or emotional.

1-4-2-0 - This is the most advanced pace that there were those who cataloged and tested for thousands of years. According to the scriptures that describe such techniques, this proportion is associated with meditative states and the expansion of consciousness.

To breathe is to live, who breathes better lives better. Breathing with more awareness will not only be increasing your body awareness, but also emotional and flow of your thoughts. Respiratory rhythms fully meets this purpose, because the mind likes diversify and maintain a respiratory rate is subject to more focus and productivity.

Article by Daniel DeNardi

No more stress, please!

no_more_stress

Stress in itself is not a bad thing. Without it, human beings would be vulnerable and would not be able to fight, work, or survive. However, the bad about this , is when stress levels become excessive and we lose control over it. The DeRose Method teaches various techniques to help maintain and control healthy stress levels without making severe changes to your everyday lifestyle.

.::.

Stress is the psycho-organic state produced by the gap between your potential and the challenges that you need to be face to achieve this. To manage it, you do not have to limit yourself to relaxation. Rather you need to increase your energy to empower your potential, and face the daily challenges. Without this stimulus, the human being would be vulnerable and could not fight, work or create with the necessary aggressiveness. Bad is the excess stress or lack of control over it. Between a psychophysical alert or another, the person would be able to redo this state of extreme organic and mental tension. Therefore, it would be necessary that there was less stress state or else specific techniques to minimize the generalized fatigue resulting therefrom.

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Our techniques are really powerful to reduce stress to healthy levels, to minimize general fatigue, and to eliminate the chain reaction of secondary effects such as: heart attacks, high blood pressure, migraines, insomnia and depression.

Article based on an original text by Prof DeRose

One of these techniques is Breathing Re-education

With this simple technique you can learn to effectively regulate your breathing patterns. The abdomen is the first part of the body that we tense when we are stressed.

  • Take deep breaths expanding your abdomen each time you inhale and retracting when you exhale (make sure you are moving your abdomen).

  • Breath in for 4 seconds, holding your breath with your lungs full for 4 seconds, exhaling in 4 seconds and holding without breath for 4 seconds.

In one year's time you will wish you had have started today!

Book now your first class with us! Complete the form below with your details and an instructor will contact you to arrange your introductory class, asap.

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How to manage stress

Pránáyáma*

Stress in itself is not a bad thing.

Stress is the psycho-organic state produced by the gap between your potential and the challenges that you need to face to achieve this.

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toon704

To manage stress, you do not have to limit yourself to relaxation; rather you need to learn to effectively regulate your breathing patterns. Without it, human beings would be vulnerable and would not be able to fight, work, or survive.

Stress keeps you up above the line, coping with daily life and makes you reach your most outrageous dreams. What is bad however, is when stress levels become excessive and we lose control over it.

The DeRose Method teaches various techniques to help maintain and control healthy stress levels without making severe changes to your everyday lifestyle.

One of these techniques is Breathing Re-education: 

The abdomen is the first part of the body that we tense when we are stressed. In order to manage and reduce stress take deep breaths expanding your abdomen each time you inhale and retracting when you exhale.

Try breathing in in 4 seconds, holding your breath with your lungs full for 4 seconds, exhaling in 4 seconds and holding without breath for 4 seconds.

Avoid inhaling or exhaling through the mouth at all costs and make sure you are moving your abdomen.

The DeRose Method is an efficient resource for reducing stress to a healthy level – 90% of those who practise it feel the effect of stress reduction from their very first session. This is because DeRose Method incorporates specific techniques that not only minimize general fatigue but also eliminate the chain reaction of secondary effects such as: heart attacks, high blood pressure, migraines, insomnia and depression. Book here your trial lesson!

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Pránáyáma: Expansion of bio-energy through breathing exercises

Pránáyáma*

Expansion of bio-energy through breathing exercises

Prána means bio-energy; ayáma, expansion, breadth, intensity, elevation. Pránáyáma designates techniques that are always of a respiratory nature and conduct to the intensification or expansion of prána in the body.

Prána, the vital energy that penetrates our body through respiratory labyrinths, taking the blessing of life to our core and, from there, to the rest of our being, physical and subtle.Prána, the biological energy without which not a single life form, animal nor plant, would be possible.Prána, that which brings the cure and regeneration to every cell.To live, all beings need to breath. Breathing, we incrementally raise our vitality, revitalizing, reconstituting our fibers, filling them with life itself.Controlling the rhythms of breathing, we dominate our emotions and actions.Alternating the depth of respiration, we conquer new states of consciousness.Interfering voluntarily in the act of breathing, we cross the boarder between consciousness and unconsciousness.This is pránáyáma!

Author: DeRose

Pránáyáma*

Expansion of bio-energy through breathing

Prána* means bio-energy; ayáma, expansion, breadth, intensity, elevation. Pránáyáma designates techniques that are always of a respiratory nature, and lead to the intensification or expansion of prána in the body. Prána is the general name that Yôga assigns to any type of energy that is manifested biologically. In theory, prána is energy of solar origin, but also possibly manifested after metabolization, that is, indirectly, when absorbed by air, water or food.

Prána, of a generic kind, can be divided into five more specific types: prána, apána, udána, samána and vyána. These can each be further divided into various subpránas. Prána is visible. On any sunny day, execute pránáyáma and fix your eyes on the blue of the sky. Wait. When your vision adjusts itself, you will begin to see myriads of incredibly dynamic and brilliant minute points that glimmer, making their rapid circular and sinuous movements evident. When executing your respiratory exercises, mentalize that image, that you are absorbing that energy.

(Master DeRose, 2007, Swasthya Yôga Shastra, S. Paulo: Uni-Yoga Nobel, p. 227)

*The accentuation of the non-translated Sanskrit words respects the original pronunciation of the language.